Jews

Consider how criticism might engage with race and religion (through two texts)

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(889 Words)

Race and religion can form vital parts of any play or novel; history has proved that tension, be it through different religions/ races of people, has stirred up many conflicts. In this essay, I will refer to two texts namely ‘The Jew of Malta’ by Christopher Marlowe and ‘The Heart of Darkness’ by Joseph Conrad. I would like to show how criticism can engage from a story and that we can see the undertones of the text that shows racial and religious streams of thought and action. These narratives both show the act of colonialism/countries powers, which are true accounts of the Christian colonizers and the Turkish Siege of Malta as well as King Leopold and the Belgium Congo.

The Jew of Malta – Christopher Marlowe

Initially, The Jew of Malta resonates with themes of religious tension, which was a parallel to the time, in the sixteenth century. There were not many Jews in England during this time. Jews in England secretly practiced. Many Jews who were born into the Jewish faith either converted or pretended to be Christians. Criticism can be pointed not only towards the non-secular people in England but also where this play tries to deal with the anti-semitic feeling that was rife throughout the whole of Europe. The Jewish people did not believe in Christianity, so they were a threat to social order. English Protestants felt that Jews were outsiders as well as Muslims and Catholics. Marlowe forces the reader to re-examine the factors that were the start of internationalism. It makes the reader comment about the internal affairs at that time. The subject of commerce and internationalism had a role in the unfolding drama that could be equal to the effects of antisemitism.

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Hitler – The development of evil

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In the multitude of years that humans have walked this planet, the German leader Adolf Hitler has to be one of the most evil people to ever come into existence. Not solely attributed but largely as a consequence of Hitler through his regime of Nazism an estimated eleven million people were killed which included six million Jews. These are staggering figures but why so many Jews? Moreover, why was Hitler so against the Jewish continuation as a people in his country and ultimately as a race? In this essay, I would like to posit some ideas on the causes of Hitler disgust of the Jewish race while showing the effects that came about as he became the German leader.

To begin with, highlighting the factors that motivated Hitler’s resentment to Jews would be by looking at Hitler’s grandmother who was a maid to a Jewish family. She was most likely to have had sexual relations with her superior as was common in those days. Further credence to this story and the likelihood Hitler’s father was born of a Jewish father was seen through his father being brought up without a father.  As a child, Hitler’s father regularly beat him and his mother. Hitler would become very close to his mother; her strong attraction may be due to losing a few children in early life. His love for his mother grew greater as he formed a greater resentment toward his father seeing him as poisoned. These daily beatings, one ending in a coma must have created in Hitler a sense of him being an evil kid and a feeling of being useless.

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How much did Hitler’s upbringing develop his stirrings of hatred and anger?

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(819 words)

In the multitude of years that humans have walked this planet, the German leader Adolf Hitler has to be one of the most evil people to ever come into existence. Not solely attributed, but largely as a consequence of Hitler, through his regime of Nazism, an estimated 11 million people were killed which included 6 million Jews. These are staggering figures but why so many Jews? Moreover, why did Hitler bring so much anger against the Jewish continuation as a people in his country and ultimately as a race?  Considering Hitler’s hatred of Jews, it is clear this vehemence was not born the day he became The Furher. Hitler’s young life experiences can be taken into consideration. He was a product of his early environment. His burgeoning disgust of the Jewish race and his anger materialized from three experiences; his father, his grandmother, and growing up.

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