Consider the treatment in one text of one or more of the Seven Deadly Sins

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(776 Words)

As knowledge seekers, many people will strive harder or try appropriate means to achieve their goal for further knowledge to the extent that bridges onto excessiveness that reflects one of the Seven Deadly Sins. Doctor Faustus is this seeker of knowledge who wants to find out more than is suitable and appropriate for him to know. Faustus is a disdainer who gets a scorner’s comeuppance. He commits a mortal sin and goes to hell for it.

Dr Faustus deals with the ambition of the Renaissance to cultivate an ‘aspiring mind’. The Renaissance as a time of intense, all-encompassing infinite knowledge is embodied in Faustus. However, he shows little discrimination in his pursuits. He delights, for example, in the Seven Deadly Sins, ironically remarking ‘O thus feeds my soul’.  Throughout the twenty-four years, he seeks experience of all kinds in the true Renaissance manner; however, instead of freedom, his knowledge brings him despair.

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Consider the treatment of one or more of the Seven Deadly Sins

Posted on Updated on

(779 Words)

As knowledge seekers, many people will strive harder or try appropriate means to achieve their goal for further enlightenment to the extent that bridges onto to excessiveness that reflects a deadly sin. Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus is this explorer of potency who desires to find out more than is suitable for him to know. Faustus mocks and ridicules but is one who has his comeuppance because of this. He commits mortal sin and goes to hell for it.

The story of Dr. Faustus deals with the ambition of the Renaissance era to cultivate an ‘aspiring mind’. Namely, the period being that for infinite consciousness is embodied in Faustus. However, he shows little discrimination in his pursuits. He delights, for example, in the seven deadly sins, ironically remarking, “O thus feeds my soul’.  Throughout his twenty-four years of power and pleasure, he seeks experience of all kinds in the true Renaissance manner, notwithstanding instead of freedom his power brings him to despair.

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